Posts Tagged ‘security’

Herald offers legal advice for domain owners

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014
Photo credit; Tristan The Booklight on Flickr
Photo credit; Tristan The Booklight on Flickr

The Sydney Morning Herald offers the following advice for domain owners to help them better protect their domains:

When you register a domain name you get a license giving you the exclusive right to use that domain name for a specific period. For .au domains this is two years.

Can someone register domain names that are similar to my business?

Yes they can. You have a license to use the specific domain names that you register. Other parties can register and use similar domain names.

Is this illegal?
No, simply registering domain names that are similar to another business’s domain name, does not breach current Australian law.
However, there are other serious considerations, including:
  • Australian Domain Name Authority (auDA) policy applies to all .au domains and all Australian domain holders. Australian domain names may only be registered to Australian businesses. and domain names must be “an exact match, abbreviation or acronym of the registrant’s name or trademark or closely and substantially connected to the registrant”. Failure to demonstrate this connection can lead to the domain name being cancelled, under auDA policy.
  • Using another trader’s registered trademark in the registered classes may be trademark infringement and a breach of the Trade Marks Act 1995.
  • Australian Consumer Law prohibits misleading and deceptive conduct, including false and misleading representations that one business has an affiliation with another business that it does not have.
  • Using another trader’s branding and/or trademarks, even if the branding is not a registered trademark, may be passing off.

How can I protect my brand online?

Legal solutions

  • Choose a brand that is clearly distinguishable from your competitors can be easier to protect and defend.
  • Include a copyright notice in your website terms that sets out your intellectual property rights.
  • Consider registering variations of your main domain name.
  • Register your business trade mark to give you the exclusive right to use this trade mark as a brand name for the products or services specific in your registration.
  • Check for infringement.

To read more on this story, click here.

Many Australian businesses live with false sense of security

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014
Photo credit; elhombredenegro on Flickr

Photo credit; elhombredenegro on Flickr

Australian businesses are living with a sense of security about the safety of their sensitive data that just isn’t true, according to the latest report from McAfee.

The report found 94% of organisations globally think their company is protected against Advanced Evasion Techniques (AET).

AETs are methods of disguising malware so it is able to penetrate business networks undetected by splitting the components of a malware attack into pieces, allowing it to bypass a firewall or IPS appliance. Once it is inside the network, the code reassembles itself and continues its mission of collecting data, destroying networks and exposing company IP.

There are more than 800 million known types of AET and the number is growing.

McAfee APAC CTO, Sean Duca, said businesses need to ensure their security solutions provide visibility into whether the business is protected.

“Australian businesses should expect more from their security provider, and demand more from the technology they already have,” he said. “If their security solutions are not able to detect all types of attacks which disguise themselves and attempt to penetrate the network, or fully visualise the threat landscape, their data is at risk.”

The report, entitled; ‘Security Industry’s Dirty Little Secret,’ surveyed 800 CIOs and security managers from Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Brazil, and South Africa, revealing that 15% of Australian respondents said their company had experienced a breach in the past 12 months, while the global average is 22%.

More than half of global respondents said that AETs posed an immediate and serious threat to their company and 69% said AETs can already exploit known vulnerabilities, while 59% of Australian respondents said AETs can already exploit known vulnerabilities.

Globally, nearly 40% of those breached believe that AETs played a key role in breaches over the past 12 months.

To read more on this story, click here.

Small and medium businesses in Australia face cyber attack threat

Friday, October 18th, 2013
Photo credit; Mathieu Plourde on Flickr

Photo credit; Mathieu Plourde on Flickr

Cyber attacks hit 75% of small and medium sized businesses (SMB) last year, according to online security company McAfee, which says Australian businesses have been under concerted attacks online.

“There is a real imperative to better understand how to keep business assets safe — from data to devices, email and web,” says McAfee’s SMB Manager for Asia Pacific, Robbie Upcroft.

In its May State of Cybersecurity in Australian SMBs report, McAfee warned that almost half of SMBs in Australia had experienced a targeted attack in the past 12 months (44.5 per cent) with one in five (21 per cent) of this number experiencing three or more attacks.

And, in a worrying sign, McAfee found that just under half (46 per cent) of Australian SMBs indicated they had experienced security breach or data loss “by deliberate sabotage from current or ex-employees in the last year.”

To read more about this story, click here.

New IronKey Enterprise site

Friday, June 11th, 2010

Exciting news: we have now launched a website exclusively for IronKey Enterprise.  Business users with over 5 employees can now purchase IronKeys to suit their purpose and enjoy all the benefits of the IronKey.

Enquiries are welcome.